Horticulture

Study for an exciting career in horticulture in a wide range of certificate and diploma programmes in New Zealand’s premium food producing region.

Horticulture Apprenticeship Programme [Levels 3 - 4]

The EIT Horticulture Apprenticeship Programme, offered at both EIT Hawke’s Bay and EIT Tairāwhiti, is designed for people working in the fruit industry to gain formal qualifications and improve all aspects of their theoretical and practical knowledge and skills. The apprenticeship programme is supported by industry and can lead to a worthwhile career. You will learn about pests and diseases, machinery, soils, irrigation and other relevant skills.

By the end of the Horticulture Apprenticeship Programme you will have completed the following approved NZQA qualifications:

  • NZ Certificate in Primary Industry Operational Skills (with optional Specialist Equipment and Infrastructure strands) [Level 3] 40-60 credits

And through a Managed Apprenticeship:

  • NZ Certificate in Horticulture (Fruit Production) [Level 3] 75 credits
  • NZ Certificate in Horticulture (Fruit Production) [Level 4] 90 credits

To find out more contact:

Hawke’s Bay | Stacey Higgins | Phone: 06 830 1623 | Email: shiggins@eit.ac.nz

Tairāwhiti | Cilla Hawkins | Phone: 06 869 3073 | Email: phawkins@eit.ac.nz

Facilities

EIT offer a practical and hands on learning experience.  Well stocked tractor and implement sheds provide students with the fencing, handpiece and forestry equipment to learn a wide range of horticultural or agricultural skills.  A demonstration vineyard is sited adjacent to the winery, as well as greenhouses, hydroponics and workrooms.

Horticulture Graduate Profile

horticulture studyRyan May is currently studying the National Certificate in Horticulture (Advanced) Level 4 at EIT. He is employed by T&G and situated on an orchard in the sunny Hawke’s Bay. Watch this interview with Ryan and hear about his past experience working at the Olympics and his reasons for choosing horticulture.

Partners

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